The small village of Priddy in the Mendip Hills, close to Glastonbury, consists of a few houses, a church, a village school and a pond. Nobody would ever think – not even the villagers themselves – that the village has an indirect connection to Mary Magdalene.

In 49 A.D. Joseph of Arimathaea travelled with his nephew Jesus II (also known as Jesus Justus) to England. According to the established church this Jesus II never existed, because we are talking about none other than one of the two sons of Jesus and Mary Magdalene. However, all those of you who are open to new information that has been hidden away from the public for so long, the existence of this son is not to be ignored.

In the ancient traditions of southern England, and in William Baker’s renowned song Jerusalemwe can see that Joseph of Arimathaea lived and worked with ‘young Jesus’ in the area around today’s Glastonbury.

For a long time, people assumed this young Jesus, who was talked about in legends and manuscripts, was Jesus himself in his younger years. But recent historical research has revealed that Joseph of Arimathaea was Jesus’ brother, not his uncle.In other words, this young Jesus was his nephew, Jesus II, one of the sons of Mary Magdalene and Jesus – and not Jesus himself.

Jesus II or: it cannot be what may not be…

I am aware that many readers cannot and do not want to accept this interpretation. Therefore, of course, you can choose to accept or reject this explanation, or simply keep an open mind – it’s up to you.

Joseph of Arimathaea and Jesus II were walking along the coast of Exmoor until they reached Mendip Hills, where they settled down. Already in Roman times different metals were mined in this area. Today this hilly landscape is a popular place for hiking, climbing and visiting caves.

According to ancient traditions dating back to Gildas the Wise, Joseph of Arimathaea was a Decurio.This describes leading figures in a community who often ran a metal mine as well. He was said to be tin trader with a wide knowledge of mining and processing of metals which he shipped from the south of England to Jerusalem.

Memorial stone for Mary Magdalene and Jesus at Glastonbury

In the southern wall of the Lady Chapel in Glastonbury there is a ‘Mary-Jesus-stone’. Most interpretations relate the stone to Mother Mary and Jesus, but there is another meaning which has become clearer in the last decades.

This stone, which dates back to the first century, could be a memorial stone laid by Jesus II, in memory of his parents Jesus and Mary (Magdalene) and engraved with their names. He and his uncle Joseph of Arimathaea started to build the first chapel/church in Glastonbury in 63 A.D., immediately after Mary Magdalene’s death in the south of France.

Historical records (1) hint at the idea that young Jesus dedicated this chapel/church to the memory of his parents. If this is true, he therefore dedicated it to his mother Mary Magdalene and not Mother Mary, as mistakenly assumed. Thus this Lady Chapel would be another St. Mary’s Church which was originally dedicated to Mary Magdalene and not Mother Mary, such as many Notre-Dame-churches in France and other countries in Europe.

The present time reveals more and more information about Mary Magdalene, previously kept from the public, or deliberately manipulated. I am confident that, in the future new findings and research will continue to alter the traditional unbiased view of Mary Magdalene. At least for those of us who are sensitive, and possessed of an open mind. As the saying goes, “Who has an ear, let him hear!”

P.S.: In the picture gallery you can see photos of Priddy and the Mendip Hills, below photos of the Lady Chapel with the Mary-Jesus-Stone in Glastonbury.

 

 

(1) the most important chronicles concerning Glastonbury are: William of Malmesbury (1090-1143), De Antiquitate Glastoniensis Eclesiae, and John of Glastonbury, Cronica sive Antiquitates Glastoniensis Ecclesie (about 1400), Woodbridge 1985

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