Although I really want to talk about Mary Magdalene’s descendants, I should start with Joseph of Arimathea. It is important to know that Joseph of Arimathea was ‘a prominent member of the Council, who was himself waiting for the kingdom of God’ (Mark 15:43), and, at the same time, one of Jesus’ disciples.

Joseph of Arimathea – brother of Jesus

However, historical research has discovered that Joseph of Arimathea was Jesus’ brother. In the 9thcentury, the church declared him to be Jesus’ uncle, probably in order that he could not be connected with the Messianic line of Mary and Joseph, and Jesus.

As long as Joseph was ‘only’ considered to be Jesus’ uncle, and not another son of Mary and Joseph, the tales of Mary’s Immaculate Conception through the Holy Spirit could continue. This becomes a hard thing to believe as soon as you know that Mary gave birth to eight children.

But let’s, for a moment, concentrate on Joseph of Arimathea. Between 63 and 64 A.D he built, together with twelve missionaries who had come to England with him, a little chapel in Glastonbury. It was made of clay, and in later years a monastery was added. But this theme I shall return to in a later article.

Joseph of Arimathea (who, like Jesus, was descended from King David) was married and his bloodline continued down the years. 20 generations, and about 500 years later, the famous King Arthur was descended from this line.

Josephus, son of Mary Magdalene and Jesus

Also Jesus’ and Mary Magdalene’s bloodline started in Britain as their second son Josephus, who came to Glastonbury with his uncle Joseph of Arimathea, married a daughter of Nicodemus. I refer to the man who was said to have helped Joseph of Arimathea to bury Jesus (John 19,30).

Josephus’ bloodline – and therefore the direct descendants of Jesus and Mary Magdalene – produce, a few hundred years later, some famous persons, such as Viviane d’Avalon del Acqs, and also Morgaine d’Avalon del Acqs, Lancelot and Parcival.

What has this to do with Scotland? Well, just south of the town of Penrith are the ruins of Pendragon Castle. Legend states that this castle was built by King Arthur’s father. The High History of the Holy Grail emphasises that Arthur’s court was there. This is confirmed by the French Suit de Merlin and the British legend Sir Gawain and the Carl of Carlisle and The Avowing of King Arthur.

King Arthur’s Round Table is a geometrical earth wall in the former royal gardens underneath Stirling Castle. For centuries it has been a mysterious place. Although the present site was established in the 1620s, people assume that its central hill with a flat top is much older. Documents, dating back 600 years, already connect this sight with the legends of King Arthur.

Mary Stuart – a descendant of Mary Magdalene and Jesus

Last but not least, the Scottish line of the Stuarts is supposed to go back to Joseph of Arimathea; the Breton line, through the so-called ‘Fisher Kings’, from Jesus’ and Mary Magdalene’s youngest son Josephus. The most renowned and vibrant person of this dynasty is most definitely Mary Stuart. For a long time, she was misjudged, and her personality was, deliberately or not, misrepresented. Only recently – such as her ancestor Mary Magdalene – she has been rehabilitated in some way.

The ruins of Loch Leven Castle, an hour north of the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, is still a silent witness to the many captivities Mary Stuart had to suffer during her lifetime.

 

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