Why shouldn’t Jesus have been married to Mary Magdalene?

People like to point out that there is no mention in the New Testament that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene. But equally one can say that there is no mention in the New Testament that he was not married. In the old scripts there is no evidence either that Jesus made an oath or vow to remain unmarried.

To imagine Jesus as a bachelor is both illogical and unbelievable! In those days there were clear laws and rules for men such as Jesus who came from an important bloodline. These rules made it clear that all male descendants had to marry, and have at least two sons. This was also applicable to Jesus of the house of David (1). He was obliged to marry.

In the days of Jesus, Judaism considered marriage to be an important fulfilment of God’s law. Therefore, it was said, “Be fertile and increase.” (2) It is only logical that Jesus also married. If he had remained unmarried, the Pharisees, who were definitely not his friends, could have accused him of a serious lapse, with all its legal consequences.

Why was Mary Magdalene never spoken of

Why was Jesus’s marriage not mentioned throughout the centuries? Why was Mary Magdalene never recorded as his wife?

Would her life have been in danger after Jesus’s crucifixion, if she had lived openly as his wife? It is known that she had to flee to Egypt, from where she set off for the south of France.

Is it the fact that she was only later removed as his wife from the old scripts?

Anyway, it did not, and does not, fit with the sexual morals of the church that Jesus – as ‘Son of God’ – had a physical relationship with a woman!

We shall probably never know exactly why but the consequences continue to be of extreme importance. For the suppression of women and (female) sexuality during the last centuries has had a devastating effect on society. We are shown this fake moral quite clearly these days, where so much sexual suppression and injuries to women are revealed.

(1)Seventeen verses in the New Testament call Jesus ‘the son of David’, also see goo.gl/8zKFd

(2) Luke 2:51-52

(3) Photo: goo.gl/qdJyPx

Mary Magdalene

Why Mary Magdalene anointed Jesus’s feet?

I told you I would write about Mary Magdalene’s celibate life. Well, we have to consider that Mary Magdalene’s and Jesus’s (such as Mary’s and Joseph’s) relationship is a ‘royal’ dynastic one. Jesus came from the line of King David, and Mary Magdalene’s father was the Jairus-Priest Syrus. The married couple were subject to strict dynastic rules which drastically differed from the usual Jewish marriage-laws. The requirements for a dynastic marriage were clearly defined. They demanded a celibate life style, strictly regulating the periods where the conception of a child was allowed.

Engagement – First Marriage – Second Marriage

It started with a sort of engagement which was actually a contractual marriage. Three months after the ‘engagement’ there was a formal ‘First Wedding’ with an anointment ceremony (let’s remember the scene where Mary Magdalene anoints Jesus with nard!). In the following September marriage began. Afterwards a physical relationship was allowed, but only in the first part of December. If this did not result in pregnancy, they had to lead a celibate life again until the following December.

Did the woman get pregnant, though, there was a ‘Second Wedding’, and the marriage was legal. The legal status of marriage was not acknowledged before pregnancy. This gave the husband the chance for a legal divorce in case the wife was infertile. Therefore, the ‘Second Wedding’ never took place before the third month of pregnancy (in fear of a miscarriage).

Why the Virgin Mary could conceive a child

These marriage laws explain why Mary, to whom these laws also appealed, could conceive a child as a virgin. Women only became wives after the ‘Second Wedding’. Before that, they were ‘virgins’, young women, if we translate the word almah correctly.

Mary Magdalene

What was Mary Magdalene and the seven demons all about

The Gospel of Luke mentions that there were also a few women following Jesus who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases. Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out… (Luke 8,2) This is, at least, the official version of the institutional church. Throughout the centuries, up to now, it has been considered to be the ‘truth’.

One should know that the group of the Essenes, who Jesus was a member of, used certain words as encryptions so that the Romans could not understand their messages and gospels.

The word ‘demon’ must not be understood literally

For example, the term ‘the blind’ was used for people who did not follow ‘the path’. The word ‘lepers’ meant all the people that were not born into, or were excluded from higher society. ‘The poor’ applied to all members of society who were not underprivileged, but held higher ranks, but had to give up all their earthly possessions.

Therefore, the term ‘demons’ is not to be understood literally. At the heyday of Qumran the name Mary (Miriam) was not just a name, but a high title.

Women with this name were in ecclesiastical offices within spiritual societies. They were, for instance, educated in the art of healing, or leading liturgical ceremonies for women.

Judas Iscariot, the seventh demon priest

All Marys were bound to celibacy and were subordinate to the authority of the Supreme Scribe. At the time of Mary Magdalene this was Judas Iscariot who was called the seventh demon priest. Before Mary Magdalene married, she was released from celibacy by the demon priest, which led to the saying that seven demons came out of her. Afterwards she was allowed to have physical contact with her husband, but only according to strict rules. However, this is going to be the topic for another time.

 

Compare Barbara Thiering ‘Jesus the Man’, chapter 17

Mary Magdalene

MARY MAGDALENE, Dan Brown and Kathleen McGowan

On one of my first journeys through the south of France, many years ago, I remembered the novel ‘The Da Vinci Code’ by Dan Brown. The movie was playing in the area. It was the first book which aroused my interest in Mary Magdalene, a long time before I came across Kathleen McGowan’s ‘The Expected One’. Both books have become world bestsellers, opening new perspectives on Mary Magdalene, Jesus, and their relationship, to millions of readers.

These two authors also opened my inner door to Mary Magdalene. Until then I was not aware that Mary Magdalene was assigned with a totally false role in the Bible. And, to be honest, I was not really interested in this historical figure.

But these two books triggered an inner wake-up call. All those of you who know me, and my work, are aware that I am closely connected with Mary Magdalene in a psychic way, and that I receive messages and spiritual tools, from her.

The Bible should be rewritten

But let’s go back to Dan Brown and Kathleen McGowan. Their tales about Mary Magdalene, wrapped into a thrilling story, allowed many people for the first time, to think that Mary Magdalene and Jesus could have been in a relationship. Their books are based on years of research, and knowledge gained from experts on Mary Magdalene. Specialists, such as Margaret Starbird and Laurence Gardner.

The story of Mary Magdalene can be reconstructed in different ways, historically, religiously and on a psychic level. However, the recognition that she was the wife of Jesus, totally questions old clerical theories and beliefs.

It is obvious that the church is not happy with these findings. Accepting them would affect the veracity of their doctrines, not only the way they present Mary Magdalene and Jesus. We know what this means. And we also know what shouldn’t be, cannot be.

Life is safer as fantasist and dreamer

Dan Brown and Kathleen McGowan were smart enough to wrap their revelations into a novel and not a work of non-fiction. Otherwise their discoveries could have been seen as claiming to be the truth and used against them. Therefore, they probably live an easier, and most of all safer life, as fantasists and dreamers rather than having the reputation of being historical researchers into Mary Magdalene.

If it was their purpose in life to present Mary Magdalene as the woman by Jesus’ side, to a wider audience, then they have more than fulfilled it. I am sure they have become immune to all the attacks and defamations they have endured through the years.

 

Mary Magdalene

THE GOSPEL OF MARY MAGDALENE – A sensational find and cold feet 

When Karen L. King presented the small fragment of a nearly 2000 year old text on a yellowed papyrus to the public in Rome in 2012, it caused an outcry all over the world. It was part of the Gospel of Mary Magdalene which she had already published in 2003. This special piece of papyrus contained a text passage in which Mary Magdalene is called ‘the wife of Jesus’. Quickly, critical voices called this discovery a forgery.

In her book ‘The Gospel of Mary of Magdala’ the theologist had summed up all her years of research and translation of a Coptic writing which was developed in early Christian times. The texts point out that Mary Magdalene was active as a female apostle at Jesus’ side. She might have even been his favourite disciple. (I will publish extracts in this blog series).

Coming back to the papyrus discovery which should allegedly prove that Jesus and Mary Magdalene had a close relationship, or might even have been husband and wife. As one might expect, the authenticity of the finding was severely questioned by the church.

Karen L. King was able to contradict the supporters of the forgery theory with good arguments, as radio carbon tests proved that the papyrus was really a historical document. But the scientist probably could not withstand the pressure of powerful religious leaders. In 2016 she gave in, and, all of a sudden did not want to confirm the authenticity of the fragments any longer.

This begs the question, what did she know, and what should have been left unsaid for the sake of her safety. For the truth of new knowledge is not always pleasant for the discoverer, especially if this involves questioning 2000 year old theses and religious doctrines.

Mary Magdalene

How Virgin Mary could give birth to a child

Christian theologians call the conception of Jesus through the Holy Spirit and the birth through the Virgin Mary ‘Virgin birth’. Some verses in the New Testament declare this fact as one of God’s great miracles. Well, I do believe many things, but not everything.

In this connection one ought to know that the gospels of the New Testament were written to deliver an evangelic (Greek: eu-angelos = ‘delivering good messages’) message, not a historic one. Religious researchers even say that in those days the gospels served ‘enthusiastic propaganda purposes’. Considering this aspect, it seems plausible that the gospels were not written to record historic events for posterity. In addition, some parts of the Bible have often been misinterpreted or (out of unawareness) incorrectly translated.

In ancient texts Mother Mary is referred to as almah. The Semitic word almah, which was translated as ‘virgin’, only means ‘young woman’. Its meaning is completely unlinked with the physical virginity. Therefore, for Mother Mary, it well may be the case she is an alma and Joseph’s wife, at the same time.

As the wife of a ‘dynastic husband’ (Joseph was no carpenter; his job title is also based on an incorrect translation) Mary was subject to certain rules. She had to undergo some sort of trial period as a wife, which I would like to expand on in a later blog. However, the rules were strict, and only allowed the conception of children at certain fixed dates.

The Catholic view is based on the fact that Mary was a virgin throughout her life, as she is venerated as ‘Virgin Mary’. But the gospels1 do not make a secret of the fact that Jesus was not the only son, which makes Mary’s physical virginity even more incredible. Even if she conceived Jesus through the Holy Spirit, and not through a sexual act, one wonders how she gave birth to other children. It is hard to believe that Mary conceived all her children through the Holy Spirit. It makes one think that the church has a problem with sexual morals in general, and women in particular.

 

1 Mathew 13,55 – Luke 2,7 – Mark 6,3

Mary Magdalene

The Gospel of MARY MAGDALENE

We are living in a time where darkness is once again rearing up vehemently against the increasing power of light. Long-fostered secrets come to light, assaults on women, which have been kept secret, are denounced in the media. And it is becoming harder to hide knowledge that was not meant for the public.

I am particularly thinking of those traditions which have been portrayed as the only truth by religious organisations for a long time. Their unchallenged claim is starting to crumble.

However, as soon as something unexpected is revealed to the public – such as the GOSPEL OF MARY MAGDALENE – it is immediately placed into the realm of blasphemy, fantasy and esoteric nonsense. What has not officially existed over such a long period of time, is simply impossible. It might even have influenced religious historiography as far as questioning the truthfulness of the Bible.

When the American theologist Karen L. King went public with her sensational discovery of the old papyrus scrolls in 2012, I was sure that the ‘Gospel of Mary Magdalene’ would not be recognized and accepted. (I will say more about it in my next blog in this series).

However, more and more information on Mary Magdalene is emerging, mostly in the psychic way. Whereas it has been possible for the powerful to let important information and truth disappear from the dark times of the past up to our times, now, in the time of the great transformation, these pieces of information cannot be manipulated any more. At the most, the Mary Magdalene opponents call them pure fantasy. But whoever sincerely seeks the truth, will find it in the heart.

 

Mary Magdalene